Berklee

A Modern Method For Guitar Pdf

Guitar

This book has been specifically designed to accomplish two things. To teach the student to READ music. This is the physical part of learning to play the guitar and as such cannot be rushed. Practice all material slowly enough to maintain an even tempo. Do not skip or 'slight' anything. That with this method, (as with all others. Is Modern Method for guitar by Berklee college of music a good method? - INT 013 - Duration: 3:36. Ioannis Anastassakis 4,774 views.

This book is a continuation of Volume I, Modern Method for Guitar. Most of the terms and techniques are directly evolved from material presented there. For example, the entire fingerboard is covered at once in the five position C Major scale study. This is accomplished by connecting the four basic (types 1, 2, 3, 4) and one derivative (type 1A) fingering patterns that were, hopefully, mastered from the first book. (The sequence of fingering types will vary from position to position up the neck, depending upon the key. ) Study all material in sequence as I have tried to relate, as much as possible, all new techniques (physical and theoretical) to something already learned. All music is again original and has been created especially for the presentation and perfection of the lesson material. Please be advised that the pages devoted to theory are not intended to replace the serious study of this subject with a competent teacher, but only to, perhaps, intrigue the more inquisitive student and maybe shed some light into the mysterious workings of music for guitar players in general. As before, good luck and have fun.
William G. Leavitt
ALL SCALES (MAJ. and MIN etc. ) WILL BE DERIVED FROM THESE FOUR BASIC MAJOR SCALE FINGERING PATTERNS. ULTIMATELY 5 MAJOR KEYS WILL BE POSSIBLE IN EACH POSITION WITH TYPE 1 AND ITS' FOUR DERIVATIVE FINGERING PATTERNS - 1A, 1B, 1C, AND 1D. THIS SAME FACT APPLIES TO TYPE 4 WITH ITS' DERIVATIVES 4A, 4B, 4C, AND 4D. FINGERING TYPES 2 AND 3 HAVE NO DERIVATIVE MAJ. FINGERING PATTERNS.
( ( S ) = finger stretch )
(F MAJ. ASCENDING)
(OBSERVE THE FINGERING - NOTE COMMON FINGER(S) BETWEEN MOST FORMS)
Make the upstroke sound as much like the downstroke as possible by favoring the lower strings with the returning upstroke of the pick. There will be a slight natural accent on beats 2 and 4 because of the downstroke hitting the heavy strings first - but this is good, as it is comparable to the drummers use of the hi-hat cymbal on these beats.
(G Maj. Ascending)
MOST OF THE CHORD FORM PAGES FROM HERE ON ARE HIGHLY CONCENTRATED. I RECOMMEND THAT YOU PRACTICE ONE LINE AT A TIME WHILE GOING ON WITH THE NOTE STUDIES ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES. KEEP COMING BACK PERIODICALLY UNTIL ALL FORMS AND SEQUENCES ARE MASTERED.
(D Maj. -Ascending)
(A Maj. -Ascending)
Note: These strokes are used with regular accoustic and amplified (high-register) rhythm playing.
DO NOT BE CONCERNED WITH THE THEORETICAL EXPLANATION OF THE MORE COMPLEX CHORDS - THIS WILL BE COVERED IN A LATER SECTION. MOST IMPORTANT FOR NOW IS THE PHYSICAL ABILITY TO PERFORM THEM AND EVENTUAL MEMORIZATION OF ALL FORMS, CHORD TYPES AND ROOT
LOCATIONS.
NOTE THAT THESE ARE THE SAME FORMS AS THOSE SHOWN ON THE OPPOSITE PAGE. THE ROOTS ARE DIFFERENT AND THE ORDER OF SEQUENCE IS REVERSED. CONSIDERABLE TIME WILL BE REQUIRED TO REALLY LEARN THEM.
MEMORIZE CHORD NAMES AND (DIATONIC) STRUCTURES IN ALL MAJOR KEYS.
NOTE: WHEN TWO CONSECUTIVE NOTES ARE PLAYED BY THE SAME FINGER ON ADJACENT STRINGS - 'ROLL' THE FINGERTIP FROM ONE STRING TO THE NEXT. . . DO NOT LIFT THE FINGER FROM THE STRING.
All diatonic chords (names and structures) must be memorized, in all k e y s . . .
(G Mel. Min. )
(D Melodic Minor)
(Practice all preceding dim. forms in all possible keys. )
(Memorize the fingering patterns. . .practice both W. T. Scales, in all positions)
(..using the preceding forms practice and learn aug. triad arp's from all notes possible. . )
This book has been specifically designed to accomplish two things.. #1.
To teach the student to REA D music Reading 'crutches' have been eliminated as much as possible. Fingering and counting indications have been kept at what I con-
y)
Continued on next page
TIME SIGNATURES:
Next
'READ' the notes, NOT the fingering, as these
. . . . . . . . . Starting on C one OCTAVE higher than C found on the 5th string, we complete the UPPER REGISTER of the 1st position
Note And Chord Review (Regular review of all material is a must!
'LEDGER' lines are added below or above the staff for
Rhythm Accompaniment BASS NOTES AND CHORDS
( EIGHTH NOTES. . . counting and picking )
First Solo Solo arrangement . . . wit h melody AN D accompaniment BE SURE TO HOLD ALL NOTES FOR THEIR FULL TIME VALUES
There are two ways to pick consecutive sets of Triplets Practice the entire exercise thoroughly, using firs t the picking marked TYPE 1. . . then practice using TYPE 2 .
REVIEW ALL MATERIAL
(Relative to C Major ) The sixth 'degree' or note of any major scale is the 'tonic' or 1st note, of its 'RELATIV E MINOR KEY'. The majo r and relative mino r key signatures are the same. There are 3 differen t scales in each minor key. . . A - N ATU RA L MINOR (All notes exactly the same as its relative , C Majo r )
- We now begin to observe that many chords have more than one fingering . The choice of which one to use generally depends upon the chord fingering s tha t immediately preceed and/o r follow. In the' followin g exercis e use the large diagrams OR the smaller optional fingering s in sequence - DO NOT MIX THEM . . . .
Be sure to observe the tempo changes. Also, vary the
REVIE W ALL MATERIAL
Of course having only eleven chord forms at your command will cause you to move up and down the fingerboard much more than is desirable for good rhythm playing.
DO NOT PRACTICE these two pages. . .just READ them, but not more than twice thru-during any single practice session. . . Do not play them on two consecutive days. . . Do not go back over any particular section because of a wrong note . . . DO KEEP AN EVEN TEMPO and play the proper time values . . By obeying
(If unusual difficult y is encountered reading these pages - go back to Page 60
(RHYTHM ACCOMPANIMENT, PART TWO) The most difficult part of learning to play chords on the guitar is that of getting the
(Regular review is a must!)
Do not 'practice' these Reading Studies, do not play on two consecutive days. (See top Page 64).
(For additional technique building patterns , see Page 46) .
(When 2 consecutiv e notes on adjace n t stgs. require the sam e finger - rol
.. . The 1st guitar part of this duet is often played using the 'muffle d effect. ' This sound is produced by laying the right hand lightly along the top of the bridge
When moving from chord to chord the best fingering is usuall y the one tnat
The sus. 4 refers to the 4th scale degree of the chord so named. . . The note name
Be sure to COUNT the rhythm until you can 'feel' the phrase. Eventually you
Reading music is a combination of instant note (and finger ) recognition and tha of playing the 'sound' that you 'see' on the music. . . (along with the relative time durations of the notes of course). . .Now try this--play the tonic chord of
(For additional technique buildin g patterns , see Page 46
All forms presented in this book that employ the 6th string (and therefore sound in part in the real bass register) have the root (first)
Now, in addition to the five major keys in the second position, you should be somewhat familiar with the most used major scales in positions one, three and four. You will have to do a great deal of reading in these areas, however, to really know them. I cannot over-emphasize the importance of learning the fou r major
ARPEGGIO STUDIES Key ' ' ' 11
of C major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 ' F ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 ' G ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 ' D ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 ' A ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
CHORD ETUDE S CHOR D FORMS
01, #2 , #3 , 14, #5 . . . . . . . . . . 62, 72, 87, 93. 101 (RHYTH M ACCOMPANIMENT )
Introductio n to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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